Welcome to T.E.A.M

Learn more about our focus on education, assistance and access to financing for minority and women business owners.

Read more

Guest Blogger

Influencer Marketing in Social Media.

Aliza Sherman is a new media entrepreneur, author, women's issues activist, and international speaker.

Read more

Tip of the Week

Does Your Business Need Flood Insurance?

Read more

Do Not Ignore IRA Opportunities

Do Not Ignore IRA Opportunities

Your Individual Retirement Account can be part of the foundation of a financially secure retirement. Many experts suggest that your living expenses after retirement to average 60% to 75% of your pre-retirement expenses. Social Security will provide some benefits, but your retirement income will primarily depend on your other assets including your company retirement plan and your IRA.

Almost every individual with earned income can contribute to either a regular IRA or Roth IRA. Here is a simple chart to help you decide which one is right for you.

Feature

Regular IRA

Roth IRA

Age restrictions

Under 70½

No age restrictions

Income eligibility restrictions

Must have earned income equal to or greater than contribution. No restriction on maximum income.

Must have earned income equal to or greater than contribution.

For 2018, full contributions can be made if Modified Adjusted Gross Income is less than $189,000 for joint filers or $120,000 for individual filers. No contributions are allowed if MAGI is above $199,000 or $135,000 respectively.

Taxation of earnings in IRA

Tax deferred

Tax deferred

Distribution requirements

Must start at age 70½.

No distribution requirements

Taxation of distributions

Taxed as ordinary income

Not taxed

Contribution limits

$5,500 for 2018. Indexed for inflation thereafter

$5,500 for 2018. Indexed for inflation thereafter

Catch-up contribution for those age 50 and above

$1,000 for 2018. Indexed for inflation thereafter

$1,000 for 2018. Indexed for inflation thereafter

Deductibility of contributions

Deductible if not covered by employer plan or if income is below certain levels.

Not deductible

Penalty for withdrawal before age 59½

Generally, 10% penalty

Generally, 10% penalty

The savings, tax deferral and earnings opportunities of an IRA make good financial sense. You have until April 15th of the following year to fund your IRA. 2017 contributions must be made by April 15, 2018 and 2018 contributions can be made from January 1, 2018 until April 15, 2019. The sooner you make your contributions, the more your money will grow.